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  1. #1
    Junior Relic Hunter
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    Scraper? Preform? Travis Co, TX

    Front view, profile, and obverse view of what I believe is a scraper. Thanks for any input!
    Attached Images Attached Images Scraper? Preform? Travis Co, TX-aa3be76b-8419-4619-8f29-b059221d78e0-jpg Scraper? Preform? Travis Co, TX-3659dacf-90de-4be6-85e9-b928a2a3debf-jpg Scraper? Preform? Travis Co, TX-9d6a3e1d-8531-4813-983a-98629a2c848a-jpg 

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  3. #2
    Rockhound
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    Looks like a nice scraper!

  4. #3
    Relic Hunter
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    Just between you and me, I don't know. To my eye, the sinuous (wavy) edge you show looks like the guy was knapping and then for whatever reason stopped. The little bit that I've dabbled in using stone tools for stuff like skinning a squirrel, cutting arrow shafts or planing down the belly of a hickory bow, I have always found it works best with a straight edge. So on the edge you show, I would pop off a few more flakes to straighten the edge before using that side as a tool. But, that is not based on any in depth study or experiments, so who knows?

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  6. #4
    Junior Relic Hunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hummingbird Point View Post
    Just between you and me, I don't know. To my eye, the sinuous (wavy) edge you show looks like the guy was knapping and then for whatever reason stopped. The little bit that I've dabbled in using stone tools for stuff like skinning a squirrel, cutting arrow shafts or planing down the belly of a hickory bow, I have always found it works best with a straight edge. So on the edge you show, I would pop off a few more flakes to straighten the edge before using that side as a tool. But, that is not based on any in depth study or experiments, so who knows?

    What gets me are the large, Long flakes taken from the face shown in the first pic. Does flaking like that really occur naturally?

    Attachment 272731

  7. #5
    Tribal Council Member
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    Forced to speculate, I'd suggest it's a flake-core-slash-camp-tool that had a longer use life than most. Flat flakes were taken off both sides from locations chosen to yield thin, flat removals well suited to cutting (some previous scars overlain by subsequent removals) ; the edge shown in the second picture, as you'd expect, looks blunted/worn from chopping against a wooden anvil.

    When the intent of a bifacial reduction is the creation of a stereotypical "point," people recognize it. But in cases like this, when the reduction is opportunistic but no less purposeful, they often don't. Partly because the stopping point can be arbitrary (or, when the flakes got too small), and because the overall form is random rather than preconceived.

    FWIW
    Premature certainty is the enemy of understanding.

  8. #6
    Junior Relic Hunter
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    Thanks for the input, uniface! Your ideas, though speculative, don't seem overreaching. An archaeologist on another forum posited that it was undoubtedly worked, but was abandoned before being made into a full fledged blade/chopper. Too thin to be a scraper, they said. I think your take expands on this quite nicely. Can't wait to spend another day at this site later in the week.

    Cheers!

  9. #7
    ⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙
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    spall that was being worked then stopped...not a scraper...not geared towards you ...but every flake is not a scraper...i have a lot of unfinished pieces like that laying around because one thing or the other wasnt going right with the piece...yall gotta remember just because a piece has edge work does not mean it was a scraper...sometimes pressure flaking is required to setup a proper platform for flake removal...which would create the nibbling edge work..
    ⊙⊙⊙

  10. #8
    Moderator
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    I see a nice point in that piece....granted it would be smaller. It doesn't look like a piece doomed by deep hinges. Some nice scars probably produced some useful tools as well imo

  11. #9
    Relic Hunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Middenight View Post
    What gets me are the large, Long flakes taken from the face shown in the first pic. Does flaking like that really occur naturally?

    Attachment 272731
    No, it doesn't. I screwed up if I gave that impression. It is absolutely bifacially knapped. Looks like good material and skilled, aggressive knapping. Was it found is association with lots of flakes?

  12. #10
    Junior Relic Hunter
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    Yes hummingbird, it was. This area has flakes on every square foot of soil, no exaggeration. Iíve found 2 broken and one complete point in addition to this big piece.

 

 

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