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  1. #1
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    Smilodon and PaleoIndians in America....sabertooth tiger

    Does anyone know any interface evidence of the Smilodon and PaleoIndians? I mean like skeletons and flaked artifacts etc? or bones of Smilodon associated with hearths, or human bones in Smilodon caves/nests?

    My reading seems to indicate the Smilies went extinct around 10 thousand yrs ago and first humans in N.A. around 14 thousand yrs ago. So maybe 4,000 yr overlap?

    thanks in advance

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  3. #2
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    The La Brea woman found in the La Brea tar pits dates to right around the end of the Smilodon time frame, and other remains date even earlier... I assume paleo people figured out how to avoid big cats like these, probably with the help of lots of yappy dogs.

    For certain proof, there is the movie Ice Age.

    Attachment 258548Smilodon and PaleoIndians in America....sabertooth tiger-destroyedcamp-jpg

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshuaream View Post
    The La Brea woman found in the La Brea tar pits dates to right around the end of the Smilodon time frame, and other remains date even earlier... I assume paleo people figured out how to avoid big cats like these, probably with the help of lots of yappy dogs.

    For certain proof, there is the movie Ice Age.

    Attachment 258548Smilodon and PaleoIndians in America....sabertooth tiger-destroyedcamp-jpg
    That's all the proof I need!
    The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

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  6. #4
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    I don't know if evidence has been found but I would think the cats scavenging megafauna kills is certainty which probably put them in close proximity to paleo people after a kill. I mean you don't just butcher and preserve a mammoth in one afternoon, and you probably didn't camp far from the kill or maybe you camped on the kill to prevent scavengers from tainting it. Imagine sleeping in the African savannah next to a fresh kill. Now rewind to the time of dire wolves, saber toothed cats, short faced bears and a host of other animals that could take you out. No imagine doing it with nothing but a stick tipped with a pointy rock. It had to have been a tough, short life.
    I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once as I ever was.

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  8. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
    I don't know if evidence has been found but I would think the cats scavenging megafauna kills is certainty which probably put them in close proximity to paleo people after a kill. I mean you don't just butcher and preserve a mammoth in one afternoon, and you probably didn't camp far from the kill or maybe you camped on the kill to prevent scavengers from tainting it. Imagine sleeping in the African savannah next to a fresh kill. Now rewind to the time of dire wolves, saber toothed cats, short faced bears and a host of other animals that could take you out. No imagine doing it with nothing but a stick tipped with a pointy rock. It had to have been a tough, short life.
    But imagine the glory that would come from killing one with a stick tipped with a pointy rock. I'm sure their were plenty of brave/foolhardy souls who undertook such feats.
    The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

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  10. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
    I don't know if evidence has been found but I would think the cats scavenging megafauna kills is certainty which probably put them in close proximity to paleo people after a kill. I mean you don't just butcher and preserve a mammoth in one afternoon, and you probably didn't camp far from the kill or maybe you camped on the kill to prevent scavengers from tainting it. Imagine sleeping in the African savannah next to a fresh kill. Now rewind to the time of dire wolves, saber toothed cats, short faced bears and a host of other animals that could take you out. No imagine doing it with nothing but a stick tipped with a pointy rock. It had to have been a tough, short life.
    Great post. Actually today my first time thinking about the Saber tooth and early paleoamericans in the same picture.

    For years I have imagined myself with a family group circa 10,000 YBP staying in a rock shelter above the Brazos River with not much except an Atlatl and a few darts, some sandals, a net for fishing and fire spindle.
    But perhaps some nights more afraid of hostile bands of other humans who might see our fire, or smoke and look to kill other humans to loot their goods.
    It must have been a spooky existence back then.

    Last edited by cat; 04-14-2017 at 06:55 AM.

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  12. #7
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    edit....last post I typed in "atlatl" and the SPELLCHECK changed it to "Atlanta".....LOL

  13. #8
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    I have often sat and thought the same thing Cat. It was a dangerous environment. The country was also very sparsely populated and there probably wasn't a great deal of contact among peoples although there is evidence of contact amongst these groups. I do think that these folks moved around a lot maybe following migration routes of game animals. The landscape at that time was much different as well. It had to be a kind of tense time when there was a kill because of just what might sniff it in the air...Shadows comparison to the African Savannah is a very good one...quite a trying time indeed not ever knowing if other humans were friendly or hostile...
    ..."the chase is better than the catch"...

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  15. #9
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    It's a powerful thought to ponder when you are camping or hiking.

    I'm sure there were times when individuals were afraid, but at the same time it's the only life they knew. Humans dominated the landscape everywhere they went with stone tools. A group of people you trusted, confidence in starting a fire, some dogs, and I'd bet they slept fine.

    MidlandMan would know better than me, but I've seen families in the Amazon who lived in tough environments (jaguars, anacondas, crocodiles, poisonous snakes, hostile miners, etc. etc. etc.) and they typically struggle more in cities than in the forest. They are at home and know the risks and signs of danger in the forest.

  16. #10
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    Here's an article on a local cave that may open to the public . Hawver Cave discoveries dazzle | Auburn Journal
    Last edited by Dennis; 04-14-2017 at 11:27 AM.

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