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  1. #1
    Junior Relic Hunter
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    Hardstone cylinder thing

    Found this thing was wondering what it is .
    The weathering looks even except where I believe it was smacked by a plow. Hardstone cylinder thing-0518172334c-jpgHardstone cylinder thing-0518172334-jpgHardstone cylinder thing-0518172335d-jpgHardstone cylinder thing-0518172334a-jpgHardstone cylinder thing-0518172334b-jpgHardstone cylinder thing-0518172335a-jpg
    Last edited by Recondigger19d; 05-18-2017 at 10:50 PM.

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  3. #2
    Artifact collector
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    Looks like a section of a roller pestle
    ...from the deepest bowels of East Texas

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  5. #3
    Junior Relic Hunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon E. Busch View Post
    Looks like a section of a roller pestle
    Awsome! Do you think it's broken or this is the size it was made because it looks like the entire thing unless it was broken a long long time ago I guess.

  6. #4
    Artifact collector
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    I believe it is broke about in half but I'm sure they still used it broke.
    ...from the deepest bowels of East Texas

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  8. #5
    Elite Arrowheadologist
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    Could be a piece of a pestle or if you have blasting in your area it could be from that or some kind of core sample. They have drills that remove rock cores that look like that.
    Personal finds are surface and on private property with permission,
    Best bug repellent Ive ever used bugband.net check it out.

  9. #6
    Junior Relic Hunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodland View Post
    Could be a piece of a pestle or if you have blasting in your area it could be from that or some kind of core sample. They have drills that remove rock cores that look like that.
    This is from the same spot I found points and flakes no blasting or drilling or even bedrock like this for a few miles away

  10. #7
    Rock Hound
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    Nice find! Looks like use wear on both ends to me.
    Carl Haemer: It seems that I never truely know what I am looking for until it is laying there at my feet...















  11. #8
    Elite Arrowheadologist
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    I'll throw something out from left field. The weathered pits on the sides remind me of the cast of a particular type of Carboniferous Era plant fossil, namely Stigmaria. And it does look like sandstone, which most fossil casts from that era will be formed in. Just a thought, not sure Carboniferous Era fossils are even known from whatever state you found that in, and maybe those irregular pits are not the bark pattern seen on such casts. That could be an example of such a cast in which the pattern on the outer surface is greatly weathered. I think many fossil collectors would go there with an interpretation, while artifact collectors will go to pestle in interpretation. As well, there are other Carboniferous plants with a pitted bark pattern. I really believe, FWIW, that this is the first thing a fossil collector would think of when seeing that sandstone cylinder. A fossil cast in the round.

    Of course, it could also simply be pecking from the creation of the pestle, and maybe that's the best bet.

    Stigmaria - Wikipedia

    Hardstone cylinder thing-619f8ed4-7e00-4f0a-94ec-17fd9f2305c0-12505-0000076e7ab233ee-jpg
    Last edited by CMD; 05-20-2017 at 06:44 AM.

  12. #9
    Graduate Arrowheadologist
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    After reading CMD's post I'm going with purpose driven manuport.......

  13. #10
    Junior Relic Hunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMD View Post
    I'll throw something out from left field. The weathered pits on the sides remind me of the cast of a particular type of Carboniferous Era plant fossil, namely Stigmaria. And it does look like sandstone, which most fossil casts from that era will be formed in. Just a thought, not sure Carboniferous Era fossils are even known from whatever state you found that in, and maybe those irregular pits are not the bark pattern seen on such casts. That could be an example of such a cast in which the pattern on the outer surface is greatly weathered. I think many fossil collectors would go there with an interpretation, while artifact collectors will go to pestle in interpretation. As well, there are other Carboniferous plants with a pitted bark pattern. I really believe, FWIW, that this is the first thing a fossil collector would think of when seeing that sandstone cylinder. A fossil cast in the round.

    Of course, it could also simply be pecking from the creation of the pestle, and maybe that's the best bet.

    Stigmaria - Wikipedia

    Hardstone cylinder thing-619f8ed4-7e00-4f0a-94ec-17fd9f2305c0-12505-0000076e7ab233ee-jpg
    It's definitely not sandstone

 

 

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