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  1. #11
    Relic Hunter
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    Great find! I would say Harahey all day.
    Every manís work, whether it be literature, or music or pictures or architecture or anything else, is always a portrait of himself. -Samuel Butler

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  3. #12
    Veteran Hunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by kirby View Post
    I agree on both points. I have never seen one quite like it. And I once thought it was a Harahey as well. Could be? But the beveling/resharpening seems much different to me.
    Nice knife Kirby, if itís a Harahey then itís a two bevel rather than the classic four bevel Harahey.

    The top example in my image is a typical 4 bevel Harahey.
    The bottom example is a 2 bevel Harahey.
    Attached Images Attached Images Alternate Beveled Blade-knife2bev-jpg Alternate Beveled Blade-dscn4821c-jpg 

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  5. #13
    Tribal Council Member
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    The edge work sure looks a few thousand years fresher than the face in those pics.
    Resident collective leg puller!

  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garscale View Post
    The edge work sure looks a few thousand years fresher than the face in those pics.
    Right Garscale, I like all of my Haraheys to have fresh edges for my next bison kill.

    The posted image was an attempt to provide a bit of educational information on the different Harahey beveling styles.

    The steep beveled flaking was difficult to photograph indoors on this grey Permian chert and I used an additional small LED light source which had to be in a lowered position to make those edges show so yes the edge work color may show up differently. I guess it didnít occur to me that I would need to defend the artifacts.

  7. #15
    Relic Hunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokyHill View Post

    The posted image was an attempt to provide a bit of educational information on the different Harahey beveling styles.

    The steep beveled flaking was difficult to photograph indoors on this grey Permian chert and I used an additional small LED light source which had to be in a lowered position to make those edges show so yes the edge work color may show up differently. I guess it didnít occur to me that I would need to defend the artifacts. :
    I don't know of anyone that knows you SmokyHill or anything of your collection that would question those two artifacts. I am sincerely hoping that wasn't any ones intention here.
    Always keep your head down and never give up!

  8. #16
    Arrowheadologist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garscale View Post
    The edge work sure looks a few thousand years fresher than the face in those pics.
    That's what I thought too.

  9. #17
    rock hunter
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    Thanks for the examples SmokyHill, those are awesome. I was not even aware of the different types.

  10. #18
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    The edge work sure looks a few thousand years fresher than the face in those pics.
    Site reports that used to be available for free on the internet are disappearing rapidly -- increasingly, you have the option of either buying hard copies of them or paying extortionate fees to get behind paywalls to access them. This despite nearly all of them having been funded by tax money, and the profession as a whole obligated to educate the public.

    One formerly available report was on the Adams Site in Kentucky (15Ch90), which is one of Carl Yahnig's Little River Complex paleo sites. Incredibly, the report I remember reading on this (a PhD dissertation, I recall) has disappeared from google without a trace, so I can't link to it as I'd like.

    Be all this as it may, there was a long discussion of this in it. I.e., that nearly every unifacial tool recovered there had fresh-looking edge flaking. The term used for this was "secondary patination," and there was (is) no credible explanation for it -- it just was the case. An enigma.

    Adams site material is not unique in this respect -- I have a paleo uniface end/sidescraper on a large blade of the type attributed by Converse as being from the plano era (Ohio Archaeologist, Vol. 13 nr.4, p.88) from Meade Co., Kentucky that also has (extensive) edge flaking that looks almost like fresh(er) re-chipping by an artifact "improver." I'm confident that it isn't, since it was offered for sale by an elderly lady who had found it, and two other artifacts, when she was a girl. No other artifact commerce.

    It's of what looks like patinated grey hornstone, dull on the three major flaked faces but glossier on the edges. My assumption is that the surfaces left by different knapping techniques -- especially after thousands of years of patination and at different angles to the axis of the item -- can be different.

    This is a long-way-around way of saying that what can look like re-chipping is not necessarily what it looks like.

    FWIW
    Premature certainty is the enemy of understanding.

  11. #19
    rock hunter
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    I think SH just used a led light to help show the edgework....

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  13. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokyHill View Post
    Right Garscale, I like all of my Haraheys to have fresh edges for my next bison kill.

    The posted image was an attempt to provide a bit of educational information on the different Harahey beveling styles.

    The steep beveled flaking was difficult to photograph indoors on this grey Permian chert and I used an additional small LED light source which had to be in a lowered position to make those edges show so yes the edge work color may show up differently. I guess it didnít occur to me that I would need to defend the artifacts.
    Well Smoky, You read way too much into what I said and went down a totally different trail. I was actually referring to the OP artifact and considering the possibility that it was a paleo reworked later.( see my origional post that it may have been something else in an earlier life). I like your harahey example but dont see it in the other artifact.
    Resident collective leg puller!

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