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  1. #1
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    Divot Stones, lets see yours

    Okay I find these stone cobbles and I know what some are like Hammers, Grinders, Game Stones, Anvils and Nutters. I found 1 the other day that doesnt fit any normal use patterns just 1 deep divot on 1 side and then 2 small shallow divots on the other side. Its a dense Quartzite cobble. It shows no use wear other than the drilled sections. Id like to know and see what others have found and if there is any reasons as to why some Grinders and Hammers have the divots and some dont. All opinions are welcome I dont think there would be any wrong answers seeing as far as I know nobody really knows what these were used for. Id also like to know how a Anvil was used. I will post my latest find 1st then later I will post my others I have found. Now lets see yours and hear the story on them.
    N. GA. Personal finds
    Attached Images Attached Images Divot Stones, lets see yours-sdc12680-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-sdc12681-jpg 
    Personal finds are surface and on private property with permission,
    Best bug repellent Ive ever used bugband.net check it out.

  2. #2
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    A few years back, our friend Roger(painshill) provided good info regarding anvilstones:

    ".....larger anvil stones undoubtedly had a variety of functional uses. There is however some interesting research from Europe by Jan Willem van der Drift in the Netherlands into one of those possibilities


    His analysis (based on both observation of found items and experimentation with knapping techniques) is that anvil stones were an essential part of the toolkit required for lithic bipolar reduction. That is, where the reduction of the core comes via forces working from two opposing sides – as opposed to freehand reduction where it comes from one side only.

    We’re all familiar with freehand flaking where you start with an irregular nucleus which can also (if desired) be further refined to a prepared core that has a regular polygonal shape, such that flakes can be readily and repeatedly struck in a predictable manner. But it has limitations.

    If your raw material is restricted to cobbles and pebbles, as might be the case if you were living on the edge of a river then you’re in trouble. Anything with cleavage planes that are weaker than the rock matrix (slate for example) is workable. But if those cobbles are uniform and isotropic in structure (like flints and cherts and many quartzites) then it’s nigh on impossible to reliably peel flakes from a round core that has no striking plane, no reduction face, no edge or rib. A freehand blow directed to the centre will be too weak to break the core and – at best - produces a dead end cone. The smaller the core and the more isotropic the material, the bigger the problem. That’s the problem faced by so-called “pebble-tool” cultures and it’s a problem that was solved by the use of bipolar reduction.

    Hold a small pebble in your hand, take a swing at it with a hammer and the combination of mass and deceleration might produce a force of no more than around 100 Newtons – about the same as resting a bucket of water on it. Your hand absorbs most of the shock because the deceleration is slow. In free collision the blow would need to be struck at about the speed of sound to break the pebble – or you would need a massive hammer.

    Putting that pebble on an anvil and taking a swing at it produces an entirely different result. The deceleration is then almost instantaneous because the anvil doesn’t give way. You might then produce a force of around 25,000 Newtons – about the same as 3 small automobiles resting on it. That’s enough to break it, or even crush it.

    That gives the advantages that it’s safer, you don’t need extreme striking speeds or enormous hammers and you have better control. For larger cobbles, an anvil which has a pointed top (roughly conical or pyramidal) gives more precise control, such that you can easily split a cobble in half, into slices, or peel a corticated flake off the end. For small cobbles and pebbles, you get better control using a “cupped” anvil and a pointed hammer."

    [Ref: Bipolar Techniques in the Old-Palaeolithic - JWP van der Drift]

    Here is an anvil stone my wife found years ago. Where it broke, there was a third area of battering, the very edge of which is present, though hard to see in these photos. It was located at the thinnest point of this sandstone block, and no doubt it broke as it was being used....

    Divot Stones, lets see yours-3cefb091-fb07-4774-9cfc-6ea4aaac2b64-1391-000001004607f38e-jpg

    Divot Stones, lets see yours-57a45efe-99b7-41af-828b-9cd6d4b0782a-1391-0000010049ed3fde-jpg

    Divot Stones, lets see yours-9e7f1935-4e1e-4fc1-b0a9-d8ba9d259f22-1391-00000100508cf3ee-jpg

    Then there are pitted hammerstones. Usually with a pit on two opposite surfaces. The pits are often presumed to have served as finger grips. I guess that explanation works for me. Here's one from one of my fields...

    Divot Stones, lets see yours-img_8795-jpg

    Divot Stones, lets see yours-img_8796-jpg

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  4. #3
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    My favorite pitted stone. Archaeologist William Fowler, in developing the original New England artifact guide for the Massachusetts Archaeological Society, classified these as a "pitted poundingstone", and he interpreted the pits as "finger grips for an implement used in crushing and kneading clay". Considered Woodland in age, coincident with the introduction of pottery. I photographed this in a way that would show just how deep the 4 pits are....

    Divot Stones, lets see yours-img_8802-jpg

    Divot Stones, lets see yours-img_8805-jpg

    Divot Stones, lets see yours-img_8806-jpg

    Divot Stones, lets see yours-img_8807-jpg

    Divot Stones, lets see yours-img_8808-jpg

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  6. #4
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    I have a number of anvils stones and hammerstones of all shapes and sizes. Heres a river polished cobble with a shallow divot on one side and no other sign of use. and a small hammerstone with two finger grooves.
    Attached Images Attached Images Divot Stones, lets see yours-p9193083-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-p9193082-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-p9081227-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-p9081226-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-p9081230-jpg 

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  8. #5
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    Here is 4 I have--2 with divots, 2 without. I'm not sure they all are hammers; esp. the round one with a flat area. I'll have a 1 of 2 and a 2 of 2 to get all these pics in.

    1 of 2
    Attached Images Attached Images Divot Stones, lets see yours-010-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-009-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-011-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-012-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-014-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-015-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-017-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-018-jpg 
    Terry (a.k.a. Dances With Dachshunds)

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  10. #6
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    2 of 2
    Attached Images Attached Images Divot Stones, lets see yours-019-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-024-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-020-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-021-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-022-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-023-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-025-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-026-jpg 
    Terry (a.k.a. Dances With Dachshunds)

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  12. #7
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    Top notch stuff, C. * * * * *

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  14. #8
    Relic Hunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodland View Post
    Okay I find these stone cobbles and I know what some are like Hammers, Grinders, Game Stones, Anvils and Nutters. I found 1 the other day that doesnt fit any normal use patterns just 1 deep divot on 1 side and then 2 small shallow divots on the other side. Its a dense Quartzite cobble. It shows no use wear other than the drilled sections. Id like to know and see what others have found and if there is any reasons as to why some Grinders and Hammers have the divots and some dont. All opinions are welcome I dont think there would be any wrong answers seeing as far as I know nobody really knows what these were used for. Id also like to know how a Anvil was used. I will post my latest find 1st then later I will post my others I have found. Now lets see yours and hear the story on them.
    N. GA. Personal finds
    Ones like that of hard material like quartzite are usually form doing bipolar splits on small cobbles, usually of quartz or quartzite. Does that match up with the site ? Yours may have been alternately used as the hammer, anvil or both.

    Keith

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  16. #9
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    Considered Woodland in age, coincident with the introduction of pottery
    Which, probably not by coincidence, correlates with the early Woodland (at least in central Penna.) departing from Archaic tradition and valuing exotic, higher quality lithics. Stuff like jasper they traded for. But for microblade cores, they collected cobble Onondaga from rivers (glacial displacement), heat-treated it, split them neatly (some skill there) by bipolar percussion (tying in with your early Woodland attribution) and turned them into mini-turtleback cores.

    [This Onondaga is the pale grey stuff, often marbled with tan, fine-grained limestone that flakes fine raw but deteriorates to the texture of an old, poorly-fired colonial brick when heated. The pale grey turns darker grey, mottled with darker grey, and becomes glossy. You see this on artifacts of later Woodland sites that were destroyed/burnt in the great war that erased the locals in the conquest of the triangle point makers.]

    FWIW

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  18. #10
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    .....

    paint bowl I found in a camp about 5 years ago.
    Attached Images Attached Images Divot Stones, lets see yours-img_7102-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-img_7105-jpg Divot Stones, lets see yours-img_7101-jpg 
    say what you mean & mean what you say !

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