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    by dannygroves74

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  • by Published on 03-02-2015 08:49 AM
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    These are thin, irregular flat knives, having angular, or curved/angular edges. They are made on chalcedony plate formations. The pieces of chalcedony plate used were usually about one fourth inch thick and did not need further bifacial thinning. Only edge sharpening was necessary leaving the semi-rough, dull looking cortical surface on both faces. Specimens are found with all edges worked, however broken chalcedony plates were oftentimes sharpened ...
    by Published on 03-01-2015 12:04 PM
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    The Nebo Hill phase was first defined in 1948 by J. Met Shippee on the basis of surface collections recovered from the Nebo Hill type site (23CL11) and three related upland sites in southern Clay County Missouri.

    Distribution: The core area of Nebo Hill Lanceolate points is primarily within the prairie regions of northwestern Missouri but examples have been found on the edges of the bordering states of Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Sites ...
    by Published on 02-22-2015 03:35 PM

    Allen points from the Plains, primarily Northern Oklahoma.
    Lyle






    by Published on 02-06-2015 09:09 AM
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    I was pulling out some pieces to send to a grad student looking at Paijan points from Peru & Ecuador, and I thought I'd share a northern cousin in what is probably the same stemmed point tradition.

    This point was found at a small seasonal marshy lake at about 13,000 feet above sea level in the Andes. No solid dates from this site, but zero evidence of later pottery groups up that high. Stemmed points like these are paleo to ...
    by
    CMD
    Published on 01-26-2015 12:17 PM
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    It was long assumed that the so-called "Red Paint People" of the Gulf of Maine were simply a part of the broader cultural adoptation known as the Maritime Archaic. However, Maine archaeologist Bruce Bourque believes the Moorehead Phase in coastal Maine, which included elaborate burial ceremonialism and astounding grave goods like huge slate bayonets, was in fact very restricted geographically to one small part of Maine's coast.
    This ...